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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

4 edition of Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, 1790-1920 found in the catalog.

Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, 1790-1920

B. Zorina Khan

Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, 1790-1920

by B. Zorina Khan

  • 54 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Technological innovations -- United States -- History.,
    • Law and economic development.,
    • Law -- United States -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementB. Zorina Khan.
      SeriesNBER working paper series ;, working paper 10346, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) ;, working paper no. 10346.
      ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHB1
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3476303M
      LC Control Number2005615768

      To understand the contradictory effects of technological change on the economy, one must delve into structural details of the innovation process to analyze how laws, institutions, customs, and. Science, Technology, Innovation: Their Impact on Economic and Political Power INTRODUCTION It is a matter of great honor and a privilege for me to deliver this lecture named after two of the greatest scientists of this century, namely Albert Einstein and Satyendranath Bose.

      Search the Indiana University Library Catalog Search the library catalog. Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, Publication Details; Availability; Add to folder. Author: Khan, B. Zorina Technical change, innovations, and technological causality: an empirical and philosophical enquiry. Endogenous Technological Change Expanding Variety Models Key Insights Innovation as generating new blueprints or ideas for production. Three important features (Romer): 1 Ideas and technologies nonrivalŠ many –rms can bene–t from the same idea. 2 Increasing returns to scaleŠ constant returns to scale to capital, labor.

      History of technology - History of technology - From the Middle Ages to The millennium between the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century ce and the beginning of the colonial expansion of western Europe in the late 15th century has been known traditionally as the Middle Ages, and the first half of this period consists of the five centuries of the Dark Ages. Start studying Technological innovations. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.


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Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, 1790-1920 by B. Zorina Khan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Technological Innovations and Endogenous Changes in U.S. Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions Institutions, B. Zorina Khan. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in March NBER Program(s):Development of the American Economy, Law and Economics.

Technological Innovations and Endogenous Changes in U.S. Legal Institutions, NBER Working Paper No. w 64 Pages Posted: 17 Mar Last revised: 28 Jun Cited by: 6. Technological Innovations and Endogenous Changes in U.S. Legal Institutions, Article   January   with  11 Reads  How we measure 'reads' A 'read' is counted each time someone views a Author: B.

Zorina Khan. Downloadable. Recent scholarship highlights the importance of institutions to the processes of economic growth, but the precise nature of their relationship bears further examination.

This paper considers how the evolution of legal institutions has contributed to, and in turn been affected by, major technological innovations.

The first section of the paper examines the U.S. intellectual. Khan: w Technological Innovations and Endogenous Changes in U.S. Legal Institutions, Lamoreaux and Sokoloff: w Inventive Activity and the Market for Technology in the United States, Lamoreaux and Sokoloff: w The Decline of the Independent Inventor: A Schumpterian Story?: Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson: w Institutions as the Fundamental Cited by: Endogenous Innovation in the Theory of Growth setting, the institutional, legal, and economic environments that determine the profitability of these investments must surely affect the pace and direction of technological change.

And even in the less developed countries, where techni. technological change. And even in the less developed countries, where techni-cal knowledge would seem to be available "off the shelf," learning to use that technology is far from costless (Pack and Westphal, ), and the rate of dissemination reflects the institutions.

Endogenous Innovation in -the Theory of Growth 27 conclusion of countless studies of particular industries and innovations, including those on machine tools (Rosenberg, ), aircraft (Constant, ), synthetic chemicals (Freeman, ), metallurgy (Mowery and Rosenberg, ), and semiconductors (Dosi, ), to name but a Size: 3MB.

A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change why and how institutions change, (b) how an institution persists in a changing environment, and (c) how processes that it unleashes lead to its own demise. The paper shows that so by introducing two conceptual innovations—–quasi-parameters and institutional reinforcement.

In this. Science, Technology, and Innovation in the United States SUMMARY POINTS The United States gained world leadership in a number of the technologies and industries of the "second industrial revolution "—electrical machinery, automobiles, and steel—through the development of large-scale mass production techniques.

The technological and industrial history of the United States describes the United States' emergence as one of the most technologically advanced nations in the world. The availability of land and literate labor, the absence of a landed aristocracy, the prestige of entrepreneurship, the diversity of climate and a large easily accessed upscale and literate free market all contributed to America.

of technological innovation. We summarize some of the growth-accounting literature’s early estimates about the contribution that technological change has made to growth, and we document what macroeconomists and economic historians have said about the importance of technological innovation for eco - nomic growth.

The second premise is that technological change arises in large part because of intentional actions taken by people who respond to market incentives. Thus the model is one of endogenous rather than exoge- nous technological change.

This does not mean that everyone who contributes to technological change is motivated by market incentives. Downloadable. We propose a model of growth driven by the co-evolution of institutions and technology.

To be consistent with Douglass North (,), institutions are defined as a type of collective knowledge about a specific environment that can prescribe how to adapt general technology before the latter can be actually used. Get this from a library. Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S.

legal institutions, [B Zorina Khan; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Technology, institutions, and innovation systems Article in Research Policy 31(2) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Technological innovations and endogenous changes in U.S. legal institutions, [B Zorina Khan; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- "Recent scholarship highlights the importance of institutions to the processes of economic growth, but the precise nature of their relationship bears further examination.

Dari-Mattiacci, Giuseppe and Guerriero, Carmine, Law, Economics and History: Endogenous Institutional Change and Legal Innovation (Aug ). Amsterdam Law School Research Paper No. ; Amsterdam Center for Law & Economics Working Paper No. Cited by: 3. Endogenous Innovation in the Theory of Growth Gene M.

Grossman, Elhanan Helpman. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in November NBER Program(s):Economic Fluctuations and Growth This paper makes the case that purposive, profit-seeking investments in knowledge play a critical role in the long-run growth process.

Downloadable. Author(s): Paul M Romer. Abstract: Growth in this model is driven by technological change that arises from intentional investment decisions made by profit maximizing agents.

The distinguishing feature of the technology as an input is that it is neither a conventional good nor a public good; it is a nonrival, partially excludable good. Instrument Choice for Environmental Protection When Technological Innovation is Endogenous Article in Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 45(3) February with Reads.A Brief History of U.S.

Innovation. age" of American science in his book American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm, (University of Chicago Press; Author: Heather Whipps.Downloadable (with restrictions)!

Author(s): Romer, Paul M. Abstract: Growth in this model is driven by technological change that arises from intentional investment decisions made by profit-maximizing agents.

The distinguishing feature of the technology as an input is that it is not a conventional good or a public good; it is a nonrival, partially excludable good.